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that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor gavin newsome, particularly, who really had an affection for this building. he saw the design. he saw the potential. he wanted to make sure that that building got built. and he said, do what you need to do, but please, if you can make that building work, we need to have that building in civic center. >> i happened to be at a green conference santa clara. he said you shouldn't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
in the association. i think concerning this item, it is important for me and all of us to recognize there are ballot points of view. if we're serious about developing solutions that work for all of us, we have to entertain those points of view and tried to reach consensus. that is the only one that we will create a workable, sustainable solutions. all we're doing is spinning our wheels. my reason for being here is because i truly have come to the conclusion that it is not only based on years on the ground operationally but years of working on development of public policy, working with state governments and justice and lower in corp. -- incarceration and working with other people. a variety of settings. i do not believe that incarceration has taken us where we need to be. i believe the war on drugs has been a failure. when we institutionalize people over extended periods of time, we take low-level offenders in the early stages and harden them and we send them to the university of crime. by the time they get out of prison, they become a bigger social problem. where i come from, whether it is the [unin
remorse. individuals who lacked this ability that most of us take for granted, that is how they feel. hopefully, i did giving you a touch of a psychopathy for a nanosecond. how do we study people like him? we can transport him out from the present to the hospital. one of the things my lab does, we built a really nice trailer in new mexico. here is my trailer. i live in a trailer in mexico. [laughter] this trailer has a really nice mri in it. we work with inmates to volunteer force studies and how to make them better. what we have found is that individuals to have those psychopathic traits, only about a third of all inmates will score really high on the straights. they have reduced gray matter density in these areas. this is the same area where that guy had the tumor. these individuals, control and for all the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start t
will be back. >> all right. our next scene is going to move us from story telling that took place during the hindu temples and india into the mogel time in india this come from hindu and western cultures brought together. when the mogels came from persia to north india they saw the story telling and thought it was a beautiful art form. they were not engaged with the story but saw the beauty in the footwork and hand movement. they brought the dancers into their courts. they were a form of entertainment. so, i want you to put your imagination caps on. we will go from the forest into a beautiful mogel palace. there are velvet carpets and peacocks walking around. there are beautiful paintings and everyone all of you, the audience have come to enjoy the court and the king sits on his thrown in the corner twirling his mustache and he called for his dancers and they come to the room. you are here to be entertained by them. this is called taught. taught is a highly stylized tuning of the mind and body together. you will see very fast turns ending in sharp stances and things with our eyes and eye
said use all 10 fingers, i'll buy you breakfast. checkpoint, security, two. i survived the situation, got on the plane. the point is this, that what's in my head i've never had to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making
with a substance use disorder and that about 1 in 5 americans has a mental health problem. treatment and recovery are the pathway forward for these individuals, a pathway that leads to improved family relationships, health and well-being, hope for the future, and purpose in the sustainment of their recovery. as we hear and see their stories, we learn that recovery happens through many different pathways and that, in every marked by care, acceptance, and respect. this year marks the 22nd year of recovery month , and this year we have broadened it to incorporate recovery from mental health problems along with substance use disorders. recovery should be the common goal, whether one is dealing with mental or substance use disorders, or both. i encourage you to visit recoverymonth.gov to learn more about the celebrations, events, and the 2011 theme: join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone. this is an important effort, to try to make sure that we put the light on recovery from substance abuse and mental illnesses. for the first time, we've invited people in recovery from mental illness
of this is through the work of staff and the superintendent and for us to be focused on what we're doing we need to improve student achievement. now, why am i talking about education that much? mainly because i have a public record of eight years, a proven track record where i've worked with people and gotten results. so, this is the type of independent voice that i'm going to bring into district 7 as a supervisor. i will bring not only my leadership, my ability to build bristol-myers squibbvxes and build consensus, but i'm going to find -- you're going to find that i'm very solution oriented. and that i'm not wedded to any particular ideology about where the solutions come from. whether solutions come from the right or the left or the middle, it doesn't matter to me. solutions we find is solution. so, here i am. why am i running for leadership? i want to focus on our economy. i want to grow job opportunities for the students that are graduating our high schools. they are now graduating, beginning to graduate with requirements. they are totally prepared to take on this high wages, high-paying jo
and residents of north beach. ten years it took us to get to this place. a lot of ups and downs and winding and turning. [ applause ] and if it wasn't for people like julie and others, who i met years ago and we looked each other in the eye when i was at dpw and we said we're going to get this done and make it even a better libraries, because libraries are centers for our communities. they are seismically safe. they are going to have the most modern equipment for our kids to grow up and promise all of the things that we promised for them to do to become even better residents. the things that keeps me going and everybody else goes in collaboration, we're doing it for you. it's not about us. it's not about announcements, about things that are politically smart for us to do. it's about the future of this city. and with these 24 branches, and now the smart thing to do, connect up with great parks. yes. [ applause ] because the vision, julie didn't have a vision of just having a great center library; right? our neighborhoods aren't just going to accept that to be the end. it's to connect it up
and are going to have treatment. i also agree with tal, not necessarily everybody that uses drugs is an addict, and not necessarily everybody who uses drugs needs to have treatment. but having said that, people that we often come in contact with will be people who have a severe drug abuse problem and generally they also have a mental health issue problem, there are often housing problems, employment, many other problems, and that's the population we deal with often. and i think that figuring a way to have an intervention so that services are available for those that need it i think is really important. i don't necessarily agree a felony conviction is the vehicle to do so, but i think we have to make sure that as we lower the sanctions here, that we do have the tools and that we have the ability to distinguish between people that have a drug addiction problem, people that are using drugs recreationally and otherwise are a functional person. >> we're going to be taking audience questions shortly, so if you have a question, just try to get the attention of someone in the aisles. ethan, let me ask
government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o ass
of the sustainable streets division. i thought it would be good for us to get an update on what was discussed there. i think there are a lot of things we can learn from other cities that are going through the same challenges that we are with our multi-modal shift and goals. i know they recently came out in an urban streets design guide. [speaker not understood] called out transportation planners as being so important to the future of america. so, i know that we have thankfully some of the best and the brightest in the nation. so, i think it would be really interesting to just get an update from them about what went on there and what it's going to mean for us and our work. >> thank you. members, we'll ask mr. haley and mr. reiskin report back to the meeting. unfinished business? seeing none. >> item 7, directors report. and we are anticipating scott wiener shortly. >> better hang onto that for the first part. i will go to the next one, if i may, mr. chairman. let me take the first awardee that we'll recognize is alan ewan who is a senior of fair collection receiver in the revenue department. he has
evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew, who is here tonight. i want him to see me so he can follow my footsteps sunday to give back to the community. with me here are my managers and supervisors. i also have my longtime friend, jamie, who has been here. i see my former boss here. i have been nominated so many times. it really feels like you won an oscar. lastly, i wanted to thank my husband, who has been not just a husband to me, but he has been my chauffeur -- [laughter] mike coy cook, personal photographer, and no. 1 critic. i know i forgot so many people to
be wrong for us to -- it would be wrong for us given the fact that we do have a labor management partnership. i know exactly who represents the employers and it really is about creating those work opportunities. i'm going to also say that i'm going to make myself available, not just to the people that are members of these labor organizations that i mentioned, but also the other organizations, but more importantly, i think the labor unions, the two i just mentioned and others are so sensitive and so in touch with our responsibilities in the community to open those doors and to facilitate work opportunities for the people that actually were part of this now before a lot of these union members came into the town. so, i'm hoping i can get some help from the people and the public to do that because i do recognize that there are conversations that have to take place with respect to these lbes. to the brothers and sisters that showed up today, i'm with you 100%. to the contractors who are here today, i'm with you 100%. but to the people that live in the city and county of san francisco,
a conversation about how we would use any new survey results in informing our plan. what i have included in the packet for you today is a timeline and some background refresher materials on the two prior surveys we conducted. staff continues to incorporate the board's direction in our plan going forward on november 13th. we intend to come to you with proposals on how we will encourage and allow customers to express their interest in participating in the program. what's been referred to as pre-enrollment. and how we will work that pre-enrollment concept with the statutorily required opt out and how we will use survey results in surveys to be conducted. and november 30th we'll have a joint puc lasko where we'll be able to discuss these more fully with the entities that have been so closely engaged on the cca program. with that i'm happy to take any questions, but i really think the information i have provided so far was just sort of to prime the pump in for the upcoming meeting. >> the fairbanks are pulling, why were they hoe ebb he en[speaker not understood]? >> they have been chose tone
they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you are working for apple or ibm. you can move from a regular employee to ceo. in the black community, it is not like this. it is not structured like that. there is no one at sagging or telling you how to operate. there is a term in the black community called a one-man army. it is someone who acts alone. he did not bring anybody with them, he is called a one-man army. he does not have to report to anybody. none of that. i do not know if that is worse than a hierarchy. at the end of the day, i mean, it is not a gang. it is a community. i know that i am not going to get the word again abolished from the media, but i want to clarify. as long as you keep putting a label on it, it will have a negative connotation towards these kids. parti
. there is no application fee. if you are interested in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last year, for 2010, i did 43 loans. so we are lending. i usually focus on six different types of loans. start-ups, business acquisitions, real estate purchases with ti's, working capital, a partner buyouts, business expansion. when i am looking at a potential loan, i use the standard five c's of credit. the first one is character. what we are looking for is a minimum score around 640. we would like to say no recent bankruptcy foreclosures, bankruptcies, tax liens. if we see a loan that has been modified, we would like to see a reason it was modified, what ever reason it may be. it cannot be, i did not want to pay that payment any more. the second c, conditions. basically, how precise will the money be used? we are looking at a business plan. when you look at a business plan, that is just a start u
problems are you coming to us when you don't even have the maintenance or operational people to maintain these parks? it's time for rec and park system to take care of the things that they build and not just continue to build things. thank you. >> thank you. so, matthew, my understanding is there is a current bond that's still in progress that hasn't been completed yet. why do you believe that we should have another bond issue while we still have one that's in progress? >> correct. great question. the 2008 parks bond passed by voters in 2008, obviously, covered 185 million dollars worth of investments in the park system. that sbair bond is already fully committed for projects either completed, under construction or in the pipeline to be under construction within a matter of months. that only was the down payment on that 1.4 billion dollars worgts of renovation work, ada compliance work, and it's going it take us many years to get through that entire list of work and is the next big investment we need to make. >> george, how would you like to respond? >> i would like to respond right
thing about the $2 million dollars is that it's going to like merced yet park and rec will not tell us anything about what they're spending the money on. they are asking for blind faith from the voters. they are asking us to vote on the bond then they will tell us after we've voted what they are going to do with the money. we're tired of it. we want to know exactly what you are going to do with the money if we're going to give you the money. thank you. >> how would you like to respond? >> that's just plain completely inaccurate. as is the policy for all bonds in san francisco, the restrictions on how bond funds get spent is very clear and very tight. the 2012 bond has a long list of capital projects that will be funded by the bond, as well as an array of specific sites and specific topics that will be addressed. for example, the 2 million that's ear marked for like merced, that can only get spent on like merced. the exact way that that money will be spent will be determined tlau a rigorous public community engagement process that is also required by the bond legislation that res
up to me and said why didn't anyone think of this before, it makes so much sense. it will save us money, it will mean more people voting for city attorney and treasurer and if that's not democracy, i don't know what is. there's a reason why this is getting such broad support and i think it deserves the voters' support. >> thank you. and dr. faulkner, would you please summarize why you believe people should be voting against this measure? >> originally it was all odd year elections for city government. the main focus was to have a lot of elections spread out so people would pay attention. that was the idea of the 1932 charter. it is good in the sense given the history of san francisco and, frankly, a lot of governmental problems we had historically, getting people to pay attention to city government has been very important. we had 1901 to 1907 a group called roof ring, they described the 18 supervisors then on the board as, quote, so corrupt they would eat the paint off the walls. that's the reason why we want people to pay attention to their city government. frankly, new en
of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help students, particularly low income and underserved students, move on to 4 year institutions. we serve nearly 100,000 students in san francisco and are a tremendous resource, we think, for san francisco. the last couple years the state budget cuts we faced, $53 million in the last 3 years alone, have really made it a challenge for us to keep our doors open for san fran
ago, a lawsuit forced our city to use a business tax that is problematic for many reasons. first and foremost, it is a tax on jobs. every time a local employer hires someone there is a business payroll tax that's levied on that person. secondly, it is a tax that is only levied on 10 percent of all businesses and many of these are small businesses who have really been asking for reform for many many years. currently we are the only city in the state of california that uses this business payroll tax. our city government, we spent 6 months earlier this year in conversations with many leaders within the community to propose a change to a so-called gross receipts tax, which is superior on a number of levels. first and foremost, it's a tax on revenue. it's a tax on profit. it's also a progressive tax, unlike the current flat tax it's a tax that exempts small businesses that have revenues of less than a million dollars but it also increases taxes for our most successful and our largest businesses. then the last thing i will mention, it is a tax that will help to recoup the revenues t
, it is one step closer to again, reengaging a citizen in government. and we have to use technology, it is one of those credible tools that while people are disenfranchised in what is going on in sacramento with the lack of transparency, we can have a much more service-oriented government that reengages people. >> so speaking of service orientation, what do you think that the government should do? and where should the government step aside? >> in terms of... >> what do you think is the role of government? it is a very general question. >> so, the role of government is to provide basic services that the private sector would just not provide. i mean, education, i mean, it is infrastructure, that means social services that means, giving people basic tools that they might not otherwise have. so really giving people in my mind an opportunity to succeed. and when the private sector, which can fall short in many areas are not providing, you know, basic services like food, or housing, or that is the role of government to step in. and we have to, we have to restore faith in our system of government. be
, the need to give back, and the need to give voice to those among us who too often are powerless and do not have a voice of their own. and it has given me a sense of duty, and purpose. i took that sense of purpose, and i studied journalism at the edward r. mural school of education because it gave me an opportunity to engage in the issues shaping my community. i took that sense of purpose, and i worked at the office of united states senator cantwell, i worked on her immigration services staff but more importantly i worked on her staff advocating for those democratic values, those values of truth, honesty, inclusion and tolerance. i took that sense of purpose and i went to school at hastings college of law. there i served as vice president of one of the largest law schools, largest public law schools in the country. i took that sense of purpose, and i applied to the san francisco courts indegint panel and there i work on behalf excuse the expression, dirt poor residents who cannot afford an attorney of their own. but i did not stop there. i took that sense of purpose, and i founded the r
super bowl and help us bring the bowl to the bay. we are doing well. keep talking, okay. i also want to say that when mayor lee asked me to do this, i told him this needed to be the most philanthropic, environmentally friendly and most sustainable ever. that is why i agreed to do this. my work is tipping point community. it is incredibly important to me and to my board and something i ran by them. we said this was an opportunity to highlight the needs in our community, 1.3 million people are too poor to meet basic needs in this region, we think we can highlight the needs in this community through this effort and make this a community wide event and not just for the few but for our entire region and our entire community. so it is important to me that that is a huge part of this effort. we will take questions, if you all have any in the back there. >>> supervisor chu alluded to it, there was bad blood, a fight over where the stadium would be. all that by-gones, axe is buried, everybody loves each other and work together without tension or anything? >> i look forward to working tog
fields. and for us in san francisco, for what i have been doing in the last year and half, it offers and empowers from our city those economic sectors that we consider most of valuable for our future. especially in the areas of health care, hospitality, biotech, and the technology in general. we have become dependent on city college for their ability to prepare the future work forces and because of the outstanding training that the college of fords, our economic future is directly tied to the success of our city college. so it is with that that i am presenting today a very important decision. in recognizing the importance of our city college to us as a city, i also want to make sure that we recognize as a family the serious challenges that are before the trustees and before the interim chancellor as we would care to meet them. there will be very difficult and important decision that will need to be made in order to address the recommendations that are set forth by the accreditation committee. there will also be a lot of good faith negotiation that will have to happen in order to prot
. it reminds us of what the history was. >> there is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available on the 28 bus to get you very easily. the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. it is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll around the lake and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is a place to find and appreciate what you -- a wonderful breath of fresh air. come and experience in this park and enjoy the people, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved ones. in the middle of pacific heights, on top of these hills, it offers a great square, a peaceful beauty, large trees and grass and greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football and picnics. it is very much a couple's park. there are many activities you can experience together. stroll on the pathways, bring your dog, or just picnic at one of the many tables and enjoy all that it has to offer together. many couples find this is a perfect park to throw down a blanket an
. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of 12,000 loans worth $4.2 billion. in 2009, the sba approved $500 million in lending. next, we have the executive director of the san francisco small business office. she was in san francisco in 1986 to open the buffalo exchange limited store, and in the 13 years she worked for buffalo exchange, tennis district manager, she held her open the company from four to 11 stores. in 2009, the mayor appointed her as executive director to the office of small businesses. next, we have the ceo of opportunity funds. he has combined his background as a community organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading pro
. for us, the capacity for us to do the smaller side is not there as much as it is for them. on getting a loan through my side of the bank, i do not require an account to do that. we would like to have it, but i do not require it. >> last question for the opportunity fund and a critic representative. are you a cdfi? is san francisco and s.p.a. in support of cdfi's being established in san francisco? >> yes, we are. we were founded in 1999 with a small business loan. that is how we started our tenderloin office. >> opportunity fund is a certified cdfi, so we are providing a benefit to low and moderate-income communities. he is the city establishing support for new cdfi's? >> mark wanted to address that, in support of cdfi's in the city. >> we have a wealth of partners in the city. s.p.a. is just now rolling out a program for r -- will be the case by the summer. let me get one last point and on the question about relationships to lenders. the question was, do have to have an account with a bank in order to get a loan? may answer is no, but the real answer to it is certainly want to do tha
and adults with disabilities in district 19? what do you think we worry about and how will you help us to stop worrying? >> so, absolutely, while i am a young person, i do believe that we really have an obligation to protect our seniors. and when you see services to seniors being cut, you have to realize that they have contribute to the system their entire life and this is a time that they need services even more than other moments. and when you look at what is going on, you also have to say that there is the statistic that you gave is actually the start of the baby booming population, as she growing older. so we actually need more and more services, we need to actually have people trained to provide those services as well. and so, i think, of my great aunt, who is 94 years old, who is i speak to as much as i can, when i think about what the senior population is going through and really care about their children and their future as well. >> thank you, mr. bryer. >> first off, thank you to the league of women voters and jr. voters for hosting this discussion tonight very glad to be here
and the [speaker not understood] together, when you have us surrender the permits and sell them for $100,000 profit, that generates $100 million. you're also leasing medallions to color schemes now. you get fees. if you look at what i'm proposing, 300 medallions at 150,000, that's $45 million. typically they'll retransfer in 10 years. 60,000 is going to be another $18 million. so a personal level five years from now you'll be with your lives and your careers and vocations. the families of the extra 150 people i'm advocating for, their real financial future depends on you and you're in a position not to forego the good faith and investment in your workers. these people, it's not their fault prop k turned toxic. rifkin when he watches the tape, create a lot of good will. >> can i ask carl a question? >> sure. >> carl, do you mind? >>> sure. >> i listened very closely to everything you say. you've always been helpful in educating me on these issues from the medallion holders' perspective. i have two aquae and may have more for you before the next meeting. the last time you were speaking to us about th
that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be looking for a day, or chatting with friends. there jellyfish. i mean, they are beautiful. >> the culmination of the animals. >> it is very impressive. we do not have this at home. >> tell us a little about some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at th
of using profanity but because it was a different lapd. it was rumored that the mexican mafia was allowed to meet in his church and that he held guns for gang members. and he was helping gang members across the border. i am certain he knew where the body of jimmy hoffa was buried when you got done listening to the rumors. now, the lapd uses home with industries as an integral part of its anti-gang efforts. not all of them, not 9000 members, but i can tell you this, homeboy industries have their annual benefit to honor people in the community as well as former gang members, the person they honored was chief charlie of the lapd. unless you think that was an anomaly, the year before they honored the sheriff. there is an alliance between community-based organizations, and law-enforcement. this is not enough. there has also been in the streets, ongoing, a relationship, a delicate one, a thoughtful one between the loss angeles police department and gang intervention. interventionists are former gang members. they have to be very careful about how they play out the relationship. they do not want
sponsored by our attorney general harris this past year, which expands asset forfet tour, it is a way for us to quickly gain resources so that we can provide services for victims and invest in greater public safety police officers and investigator to deal with these crimes. i am opposed to prop 35, number one because the author of it is the single individual, deep pocket putting this forward. it is not a citizen's initiative. never came to talk to me what was wrong or short with our bill that he had to go to the ballot and expanding the definition to those who have to register as sex offenders to include those who have not even committed a sex crime, i think delutes the benefit of our sex registry. >> i think that the support for 35 is a no-brainer. i support 35. i do agree that the problem with sex trafficking in our society in california is a very significant one. in san francisco is frankly the epi center of sex trafficking industry. and i find it interesting that the attorney general participated with the senator in his abnormal legislation and she did not do much about sex trafficking w
+.ó boston, wens iris or boy we are allvgá÷ san franciscans. some of us are natives, like my daughters.yothers are immigrante imcome babt and myself. over the next four years as5j san franciscans, we will all expend $25 billion. i would like to see that money used to make this wind and fog swept peninsula the best that it has ever been. $25 billion is an enormous fortune and in four years time that investment could find all of our citizens on the same page, and make san francisco the envy of the world. i support projects that we all favor, and will facilitate such projects if elected, rather than ill-conceived, divisive projects like the central subway or eight washington street. i pledge, if elected as your supervisor, to serve the entire four years in that office. will the 9q make that same pledttremember ty considered being appointed as the district attorney, and run unsuccessfully for mayor twice. will he run again in 2014 for the state assembly? the incumbent, if reelected, may be real estat replaced by an apd supervisor for half the next term. i find that unacceptable in our demo
constructive steps to remove the barriers. the ada gives us some guidance on that. readily achievable says it can be done quickly and easily without a whole lot of steps. feasible means that it may require a lot more money, a lot more alteration to get that done. under the ada, you need to be surveying your property and putting together both a short- term plan and a long-term plan. the short term plan is going to be the readily achievable solution. the long-term plan could take 20 years. i do not know. your business might not be making huge profits. you may need to be saving money for the long term. but it is your obligation to plan for the long term as well as the short term. the ada has a set of priorities that guide you on how you will be serving your property. the ada says a certain party of getting in the front door, but you are logical, you want your customers to access your services. be that steps, be that ramps, if the door is not wide enough, if the landing is not level enough. priority two is actually travel. once you get into your business and start speculating the wits of your
't just keep going back to homeowners with bonds and parcel taxes and use them as the city's atm. we have to champion entrepreneurs. that means if someone has a good idea, city hall should help make it happen, not delay it with bureaucratic roadblocks. we need a one-stop shop at city hall that makes it easy to start and grow small business. a dynamic local economy depends on small business. we can't live on facebook alone. i'm a small business owner and i know why it's important to streamline the process at city hall. i have also held government accountable, both as a journalist and in my social justice work at the aclu. i'll hold government accountable again. this time from inside city hall. san francisco is a city of neighborhoods which is why it's important that your supervisor pay attention to what our neighborhoods need. i want to focus on kids and families. too many are moving away from san francisco. we need them. that's why i want to make sure our parks are centered on recreation for kids, families and pets. we need more affordable middle class housing for families and most import
with the transportation authority to secure a grant that will help us staff the balboa park supervisory committee which will be basically working to ensure that there is a regular update of all of the interim projects that are being delivered so that we can keep ourselves and the city on track to move forward. and lastly, before i close, there is a resolution in front of you that outlines the intent to move forward on the [speaker not understood]. and that concludes my presentation. i'm open for any questions. >> are there members of the public that wish to address -- >> mr. chairman, no member of the public turned in a speaker card regarding this item. >> would you like to speak about this? >> this is about balboa park. >> thank you. >> good afternoon, sir. >>> i apologize for not filling out a speaker card. my name is charlie [speaker not understood] and i'm here representing people of environmental and economic rights, we're an environmental and economic justice organization. first off i want to say it's really exciting to hear about all the changes being put forward for the balboa park station. i t
to the san joaquin tributaries authority commission. mr. pilpher has -- >> i'll use my time wisely. several items starting with 9e on page 16, the commission office address is still the market street address. i assume that will get updated in the proposed permit. i also found fascinating the lead from the spring valley water company to that certain land in the vicinity of what's now 19,000 [speaker not understood], the area near ranchero south of, et cetera, et cetera. >> and the fascination was? >> i had heard that the spring valley water company owned some property in southwestern san francisco in the early part of the 1900s and this explains that. there was -- >> you could have called mr. houser and he would have told you. >> mr. houche? in the archive. >> i was at a presentation at the municipal rail ways history that did tie that to michael o'shaughnessy and talked about the establishment of muni and the water system at the same time. so, i thought that was all very timely. just wanted to point that out. on item f, i assume that the hrc form for the waiver of 12 b and 14 b is going to
just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my l
used his help on this project. tina of the russian river neighbors wasn't able to be here, but her colleagues were and we thank the russian hill neighbors for standing by us, our sister organizations, all of our schools. nester from the telegraph center. we're honored by the number of people who have stood by us on this project. a special shutout to our families, to the spouses and the children that have had to work around and make due for so long while we were away doing something else. a special thanks to my husgreg husband greg smith. [ applause ] greg let us cut his birthday trip to hawaii short by a day and fly back on his birthday, so i could be here today. so if you wouldn't mind saying happy birthday greg. happy birthday greg! so this is a threshold, a beginning, a start. we're going to build a new library. there are a couple of other starts today. today is the start of the effort to raise money to furnish and equip that library. the friends of the library have done an incredible job of doing that with 23 other branches. we're the last. we don't want to tiredly limp over
meltzer, steve dixon, and jack hirsch man. >> you can black as out of the press, blog and arrest us, tear gas, mace, and shoot us, as we know very well, you will, but this time we're not turning back. we know you are finished. desperate, near the end. hysterical in your flabbergastlyness. amen. >> after the readings, the crowd headed to a reception upstairs by wandering through the other gallery rooms in the historic home. the third floor is not usually reserved for just parties, however. it is the stage for live performances. ♪ under the guidance of musical curators, these three, meridian has maintained a strong commitment to new music, compositions that are innovative, experimental, and sometimes challenging. sound art is an artistic and event that usually receives short shrift from most galleries because san francisco is musicians have responded by showing strong support for the programming. ♪ looking into meridian's future, she says she wants to keep doing the same thing that she has been doing since 1989. to enlighten and disturbed. >> i really believe that all the arts have a se
francisco. it's interesting for those of us in the pioneer park project is trying to make the point that not only the tower, not only this man-built edifice here is a symbol of the city but also the green space on which it sits and the hill to which is rests. to understand them, you have to understand the topography of san francisco. early days of the city, the city grows up in what is the financial district on the edge of chinatown. everything they rely on for existence is the golden gate. it's of massive importance to the people what comes in and out of san francisco bay. they can't see it where they are. they get the idea to build a giant wooden structure. the years that it was up here, it gave the name telegraph hill. it survived although the structure is long gone. come to the 1870's and the city has growed up remarkably. it's fueled with money from the nevada silver mines and the gold rush. it's trying to be the paris of the west. now the beach is the suburbs, the we will their people lived on the bottom and the poorest people lived on the top because it was very hard getting
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